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Cancer scenario 2015, Guwahati.

Saturday, 13th June 2015, 7:00 pm at Hotel Radisson Blu, Guwahati

Head & Neck Cancer

headnneck

Surgery to treat head and neck cancer can be complex. Ensuring a better survival is the main goal of treatment. Our team also makes sure that other considerations like maintaining patient’s quality of life and appearance and preserving functions such as speech, swallowing, taste, and hearing are treated with equal importance.

The team meets weekly to develop a comprehensive care plan for each individual patient, taking into account all facets of care and the entire range of treatment options.

Diagnostic Tests:

  • Physical Health Check and Medical History
    The team of doctors/nurses will take a complete medical history, noting all symptoms and risk factors. The doctor(s) will thoroughly examine the head and neck area for abnormalities, looking at the inside of the mouth and throat, and using mirrors and lights to examine all possible areas. .
  • Endoscopy
    In some cases, the doctor may use a flexible, lighted tube called an endoscope to examine areas of the head and neck that are less accessible. This tube may be inserted through the nose or mouth using a topical anesthetic (a medication applied directly to the nose and throat) which makes the examination more comfortable.
  • Imaging Tests
    Imaging tests such as CT scans, MRI, or ultrasound may be taken to gain more information about the location and extent of the cancer or tumor. Our team also uses PET scans to help diagnose head and neck cancers and are often combined with CT or MRI to determine whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes in the neck or other areas of the body.
  • Biopsy
    A biopsy involves removing a small amount of tissue or fluid for examination under a microscope. Depending on the location and size of the nodule or tumor, a biopsy can be performed with either a small scalpel or needle in an outpatient setting, or in the hospital while the patient is under general anesthesia.

Staging:
After a diagnosis has been made, doctors will actuate the extent of the tumor, using information collected from exams and diagnostic tests to describe how advanced it is, and if and where the cancer has spread.

All this information is used to determine the best course of treatment for each patient and to establish the measure of the patient's prognosis.

Treatment
Many cancers of the head and neck can be cured, especially if they are found early. Treatment varies according to the type, location, and extent of the cancer, and often includes a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  • Surgery
    Surgery is the primary treatment for most cancers of the head and neck. Our surgeons attempt to remove tumor(s) while preserving nearby structures involved in sensory and physical functioning.
  • Minimally invasive surgery
    Minimally invasive surgical techniques are used when tumors are located near structures involved in sensory and physical functioning. It’s a procedure that involves the slightest invasion and results in fast healing.
    • Radiation Therapy
      Radiation therapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy is a standard procedure of treatment for many patients with head and neck cancers. Following are the two types of radiation therapies.

    • External-beam radiation therapy
      Our radiation oncologists use a type of external-beam radiation therapy called intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), which uses highly sophisticated computer software and three-dimensional images from CT scans to deliver radiation to tumors with greater precision than conventional radiation therapy.
    • Brachytherapy
      Tiny, radioactive seeds are implanted into the tumor site, where they deliver the highest dose of radiation possible with minimal effect on nearby healthy tissue.
  • Chemotherapy
    Chemotherapy, at many times in combination with radiation therapy, is used to treat head and neck cancers that are difficult to reach surgically or that cannot be cured by surgery alone.

    This approach is also used to treat patients for whom surgery would cause significant functional or cosmetic disability, such as loss of the larynx (voice box), with its associated loss of natural voice and the need for a permanent stoma (hole) in the front of the neck.

  • Investigational approach
    Onkaulogy Kombine continues to evaluate novel chemotherapy drugs, new drug combinations, and other strategies to improve the standard of care for head and neck cancer.

  • Biopsy
    A biopsy involves removing a small amount of tissue or fluid for examination under a microscope. Depending on the location and size of the nodule or tumor, a biopsy can be performed with either a small scalpel or needle in an outpatient setting, or in the hospital while the patient is under general anesthesia.

Staging:
After a diagnosis has been made, doctors will actuate the extent of the tumor, using information collected from exams and diagnostic tests to describe how advanced it is, and if and where the cancer has spread.

All this information is used to determine the best course of treatment for each patient and to establish the measure of the patient's prognosis.

Treatment
Many cancers of the head and neck can be cured, especially if they are found early. Treatment varies according to the type, location, and extent of the cancer, and often includes a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  • Surgery
    Surgery is the primary treatment for most cancers of the head and neck. Our surgeons attempt to remove tumor(s) while preserving nearby structures involved in sensory and physical functioning.
  • Minimally invasive surgery
    Minimally invasive surgical techniques are used when tumors are located near structures involved in sensory and physical functioning. It’s a procedure that involves the slightest invasion and results in fast healing.
    • Radiation Therapy
      Radiation therapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy is a standard procedure of treatment for many patients with head and neck cancers. Following are the two types of radiation therapies.

    • External-beam radiation therapy
      Our radiation oncologists use a type of external-beam radiation therapy called intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), which uses highly sophisticated computer software and three-dimensional images from CT scans to deliver radiation to tumors with greater precision than conventional radiation therapy.
    • Brachytherapy
      Tiny, radioactive seeds are implanted into the tumor site, where they deliver the highest dose of radiation possible with minimal effect on nearby healthy tissue.
  • Chemotherapy
    Chemotherapy, at many times in combination with radiation therapy, is used to treat head and neck cancers that are difficult to reach surgically or that cannot be cured by surgery alone.

    This approach is also used to treat patients for whom surgery would cause significant functional or cosmetic disability, such as loss of the larynx (voice box), with its associated loss of natural voice and the need for a permanent stoma (hole) in the front of the neck.

  • Investigational approach
    Onkaulogy Kombine continues to evaluate novel chemotherapy drugs, new drug combinations, and other strategies to improve the standard of care for head and neck cancer.