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Cancer scenario 2015, Guwahati.

Saturday, 13th June 2015, 7:00 pm at Hotel Radisson Blu, Guwahati

Soft Tissue and Bone Cancer

cancer specialist bone cancer soft tissue cancer breast cancer surgeon sameer kaul

Bone Cancer:
Bones are made up of hard or compact, cartilaginous (tough, flexible), and fibrous tissue, as well as elements of bone marrow. Cancer can begin in any type of bone tissue.

Sarcomas are bone cancers that can grow in any bone in the body. Most cancers that occur in the bone have spread from another part of the body, such as the breast or lung. These are known as metastatic bone cancers and differ from cancers that start in bone.

Soft tissue Cancer:
These are malignant (cancerous) tumours that can develop from muscle, fibrous tissue or fat surrounding joints, blood vessel, or deep skin tissues. They can develop in any part of the body.

Soft-tissue cancers can be of various types

  • Osteosarcoma, which arises from osteoid (hard) tissue in the bone. This tumour occurs most often in the knee and upper arm.
  • Chondrosarcoma, which begins in cartilaginous tissue that pads the ends of bones and lines the joints.
  • Chondrosarcoma occurs most often in the pelvis (located between the hip bones), upper leg, and shoulder.
  • The Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFTs), which usually occur in bone but may also arise in soft tissue. ESFTs occur most commonly along the backbone and pelvis and in the legs and arms.

Symptoms:
The most common bone cancer symptom is pain, which becomes more constant as the cancer progresses. A lump may be felt, depending on where the tumor is found.

Diagnosis:

  • X-rays, which can show the location, shape and size of a tumor.
  • A bone scan, which is a test in which a small amount of radioactive material is injected into a blood vessel and travels through the bloodstream; it then collects in the bones and is detected by a scanner.
  • A computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure.
  • A positron emission tomography (PET) scan, in which a small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein, and a scanner is used to make detailed, computerized pictures of areas inside the body where the glucose is used.
  • Biopsy (removal of a tissue sample from the bone tumor) to determine whether cancer is present. The surgeon may perform a needle biopsy or an incisional biopsy.
  • An angiogram, which is an x-ray of blood vessels.
  • Treatment:
    At Onkaulogy Kombine, we ensure optimal care for any cancer related to the bone and soft tissue. Patients will receive care from our team of expert surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists and medical oncologists in association with bone and soft tissue specialists, psychologists, dietians, physiotherapists, and palliative care professionals.

    Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the cancer, as well as the person’s age and general health.

    • Surgery is the usual treatment for bone cancer. The surgeon removes the entire tumor with negative margins (no cancer cells are found at the edge or border of the tissue removed during surgery). The surgeon may also use special surgical techniques to minimize the amount of healthy tissue removed with the tumor.
    • Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to kill cancer cells. Patients who have bone cancer usually receive a combination of anticancer drugs. However, chemotherapy is not currently used to treat chondrosarcoma.
    • Radiation therapy, also called radiotherapy, involves the use of high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. This treatment may be used in combination with surgery. It is often used to treat chondrosarcoma, which cannot be treated with chemotherapy, as well as ESFTs. It may also be used for patients who refuse surgery.
    • Cryosurgery is the use of liquid nitrogen to freeze and kill cancer cells. This technique can sometimes be used instead of conventional surgery to destroy the tumor.

    Bone cancer sometimes metastasizes, particularly to the lungs, or can recur (come back), either at the same location or in other bones in the body. People who have had bone cancer should see their doctor regularly and report any unusual symptoms right away. At Onkaulogy Kombine we ensure regular follow ups, for a smooth recovery for you.

Symptoms:
The most common bone cancer symptom is pain, which becomes more constant as the cancer progresses. A lump may be felt, depending on where the tumor is found.

Diagnosis:

  • X-rays, which can show the location, shape and size of a tumor.
  • A bone scan, which is a test in which a small amount of radioactive material is injected into a blood vessel and travels through the bloodstream; it then collects in the bones and is detected by a scanner.
  • A computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure.
  • A positron emission tomography (PET) scan, in which a small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein, and a scanner is used to make detailed, computerized pictures of areas inside the body where the glucose is used.
  • Biopsy (removal of a tissue sample from the bone tumor) to determine whether cancer is present. The surgeon may perform a needle biopsy or an incisional biopsy.
  • An angiogram, which is an x-ray of blood vessels.
  • Treatment:
    At Onkaulogy Kombine, we ensure optimal care for any cancer related to the bone and soft tissue. Patients will receive care from our team of expert surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists and medical oncologists in association with bone and soft tissue specialists, psychologists, dietians, physiotherapists, and palliative care professionals.

    Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the cancer, as well as the person’s age and general health.

    • Surgery is the usual treatment for bone cancer. The surgeon removes the entire tumor with negative margins (no cancer cells are found at the edge or border of the tissue removed during surgery). The surgeon may also use special surgical techniques to minimize the amount of healthy tissue removed with the tumor.
    • Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to kill cancer cells. Patients who have bone cancer usually receive a combination of anticancer drugs. However, chemotherapy is not currently used to treat chondrosarcoma.
    • Radiation therapy, also called radiotherapy, involves the use of high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. This treatment may be used in combination with surgery. It is often used to treat chondrosarcoma, which cannot be treated with chemotherapy, as well as ESFTs. It may also be used for patients who refuse surgery.
    • Cryosurgery is the use of liquid nitrogen to freeze and kill cancer cells. This technique can sometimes be used instead of conventional surgery to destroy the tumor.

    Bone cancer sometimes metastasizes, particularly to the lungs, or can recur (come back), either at the same location or in other bones in the body. People who have had bone cancer should see their doctor regularly and report any unusual symptoms right away. At Onkaulogy Kombine we ensure regular follow ups, for a smooth recovery for you.